Indigenous women’s experiences of domestic and family violence and its impact on relocation, housing stability and parenting

Dr Silke Meyer

Central Queensland University

This presentation is based on qualitative face-to-face interviews with Indigenous women in two regional Queensland research sites. Interviews focused on women’s experiences of domestic and family violence, related housing instabilities and the role of children. These interviews formed part of a larger study on cultural and regional differences in Indigenous and non-Indigenous women’s experiences of domestic and family violence and related homelessness. Findings reveal the role of intergenerational trauma, a normalisation of violence, the role of community and kinship ties and other challenges associated with leaving an abusive relationship in regional and remote settings. For many women, the decision to leave increased their risk of homelessness and their loss of social support. Implications for interventions will be discussed.

Biography

Dr Silke Meyer is a Lecturer at the Queensland Domestic and Family Violence Research Centre at Central Queensland University. She is currently developing and delivering a new postgraduate program in Domestic and Family Violence Practice. Her research centres on different aspects of domestic and family violence, including women and children’s safety and wellbeing, perpetrator accountability and experiences specific to Australian Indigenous communities. Dr Meyer’s most recent projects examine cultural and regional differences in women’s experiences of domestic and family violence and related homelessness, engaging Domestic and Family Violence perpetrators as fathers and factors associated with Indigenous and non-Indigenous parents’ help-seeking.